“Doria Pamphilj” in London, 1998

[Back to Roma]

Notes on special exhibition “Doria Pamphilj Gallery” in the North Wing, Room 30, National Gallery, London 1998 (visited 31 Mar 1998) / Notiz zur Sonderausstellung “Doria Pamphilj Gallery” in der National Gallery, London 1998 (besucht am 31.3.1998)

Commentary signs / Erläuterungstafeln:

(1) Claude Lorrain, 1604/5? – 1682: View of Delphi with a Procession

Oil on canvas. Signed and dated 1650. Inscribed: hac itur ad Delphes (This is the way to Delphi)

This picture and its pendant, hanging on the other side of the door, were painted in 1649-50 for Camillo Pamphilj, the nephew of Pope Innocent X. Camillo had been made a cardinal in 1644 but renounced the purple in 1647 to marry Olimpia Aldobrandini, Principessa of Rossano.

The town of Delphi on the slopes of Mount Parnassos in Greece was built to serve the oracle of the God Apollo. Here, the figures bear gifts, which were customarily presented as votive offerings. Claude, who may have invented the subject, later painted another version of it (Art Institute of Chicago). X 2197

(2) Claude Lorrain, 1604/5? – 1682: Landscape with Watermill and Dancing Figures

Oil on canvas.

This picture and its pendant, hanging on the other side of the door, were painted in 1649-50 for Camillo Pamphilj, the nephew of Pope Innocent X. Claude had already painted a pair of pictures for him but for reasons which are unclear Camillo never took possession of them and they were acquired by the Duc de Bouillon, general of the Papal armies. They are now in the National Gallery (Lower Floor Gallery B).

This work repeats the composition of one of the Gallery’s paintings, Marriage of Isaac and Rebekah, but unlike that work does not bear any inscription identifying the subject. The artist may have sought only to evoke the pastoral harmony of the classical world. X 2191